Monday, May 14, 2012

Bombardier Dash 8 or Qseries

Bombardier Q400 
Narrow-body, turboprop airliner
National origin
Bombardier Aerospace & de Havilland Canada
First Flight
June 20, 1983
1984 with NorOntair
Primary users
Air Canada Jazz, United Express, Flybe, Horizon Air
Number built
1,054 as of 2011
Unit Cost
Q200: US$13 million
Q300: US$17 million
Q400: US$27 million
The Bombardier Dash 8 or Q-Series, previously known as the de Havilland Canada Dash 8 or DHC-8, is a series of twin-engined, medium range, turboprop airliners. Introduced by de Havilland Canada (DHC) in 1984, they are now produced by Bombardier Aerospace. Over 1,000 Dash 8s of all models have been built, with Bombardier forecasting a total production run of 1,192 aircraft of all variants through to 2016.
The Dash 8 was developed from the de Havilland Canada Dash 7, which featured extreme short take-off and landing (STOL) performance. With the Dash 8, DHC focused on improving cruise performance and lowering operational costs. The engine chosen was the Pratt & Whitney Canada PW100. The aircraft has been delivered in four series. The Series 100 has a maximum capacity of 39, the Series 200 has the same capacity but offers more powerful engines, the Series 300 is a stretched, 50-seat version, and the Series 400 is further stretched to 78 passengers. Models delivered after 1997 have cabin noise suppression and are designated with the prefix, "Q". Production of the Series 100 ceased in 2005, and the Q200 and Q300 in 2009. Bombardier is considering launching a stretched version of the Q400.

  • Series 100

DHC-8-100 series
Original 37–39 passenger version that entered service in 1984. The original engine was the PW120A (CAA validated on December 13, 1985); later units used the PW121 (CAA validated on February 22, 1990). Rated engine power is 1,800 shp (1,340 kW).
1984 variant powered by either two PW120 or PW120A engines and a 33,000 lb (15,000 kg) takeoff weight.
1986 variant powered by either two PW120A or PW121 engines and a 34,500 lb (15,650 kg) takeoff weight.
1987 variant powered by two PW121 engines and a 34,500 lb (15,650 kg) takeoff weight (can be modified for a 35,200 lb [15,950 kg] take-off weight)
1990 variant powered by two PW120A engines with revised Heath Tecna interior.
1992 variant powered by two PW121 engines and a 36,300 lb (16,450 kg) takeoff weight.
Two aircraft for Maritime Pollution Surveillance, operated by Transport Canada, equipped with the MSS 6000 Surveillance system.
Military transport version for the Canadian Forces in Europe.
Military navigation training version for the Canadian Forces.
A United States Air Force range control aircraft equipped with AN/APS-143(V)-1 radar that operates out of Tyndall AFB, Florida to ensure that the overwater military ranges in the Gulf of Mexico are clear of civilian boats and aircraft during live fire tests of air-launched missiles and other hazardous military activities. Two aircraft are assigned to the 82d Aerial Targets Squadron for the support of training missions.
  • Series 200

DHC-8-200 Series
Series 100 airframe with more powerful Pratt & Whitney Canada PW123 engines (rated at 2,150 shp or 1,600 kW) for improved performance also capable of carrying 37 to 39 passengers.
1995 variant powered by two PW123C engines.
1995 variant powered by two PW123D engines.
Version of the DHC-8-200 with the ANVS system.
  • Series 300

DHC-8-300 Series
Stretched 3.43 metres (11.3 ft) over the Series 100/200, a 50–56 passenger version that entered service in 1989. The Q300 is powered by the Pratt & Whitney PW123 or PW123B or PW123E, rated at 2,380-2,500 shp or 1,774-1,864 kW.
1989 variant powered by two PW123 engines
1990 variant powered by two PW123A engines with revised Heath Tecna interior.
1992 variant powered by two PW123B engines
1995 variant powered by two PW123E engines
Version of the DHC-8-300 with increased payload.
Version of the DHC-8-300 with the ANVS system.
DHC-8-300 MSA
Upgraded variant with L3 for maritime surveillance platform.
  • Series 400
Stretched and improved 70–78 passenger version that entered service in 2000. Its 360 knot (667 km/h) cruise speed is 60-90 knots (111-166 km/h) higher than its competitors/predecessors. Powered by PW150A engines rated at 5,071 shp (3,781 kW) at maximum power (4,850 shp or 3,620 kW maximum continuous rated). The maximum operating altitude is 25,000 ft (7,600 m) for the standard version, although a version with drop-down oxygen masks is offered, which increases maximum operating altitude to 27,000 ft (8,200 m). All Q400s include the ANVS system.
Version of the Q400 with updated cabins, lighting, windows, overhead bins, landing gear, as well as reduced fuel and maintenance costs.
2 Q400 adapted to the water bombing role by Cascade Aerospace for the French Sécurité Civile. The tanker mode can carry 2,600 US gallon of retardant, foam or water and travel at 340 knots.
1999 variant with a maximum of 68 passengers.
1999 variant with a maximum of 70 passengers.
1999 variant with a maximum of 78 passengers.
2008 converted pallet freighter variant with a payload of 9000 kg.
2007 converted for use as a maritime patrol aircraft.